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Kidsafe WA Latest News
Sea Play on the Bay
Wednesday, October 02, 2019

The Kidsafe WA Playground Advisory Service (PAS) was honoured to be recognised as a joint winner in the recent AILA WA Landscape Architecture Awards for Sea Play on the Bay on the Busselton Foreshore. Kidsafe WA’s PAS worked as safety consultants with the designers Plan E and the construction team, to help guide the construction of a play space that is engaging for children and has an element of risk.

Sea Play on the Bay’s design was inspired by the city’s maritime history and coastal landscape. The centrepiece of the playground is the impressive bespoke designed clipper ship. This represents the clipper ships that transported goods and people from Busselton Jetty.


The play space is comprised of both a wet and dry area which creates an environment that engages children’s senses. Sea Play on the Bay was commended for its non-traditional design that incorporates many elements such as lighting, water and bespoke play equipment. The play space also includes a range of equipment that is suitable for children of all ages and abilities. Dramatic special effect lighting is also featured in this play space which enables the park to be used by patrons both day and night.

The play space is situated at the popular Busselton Foreshore it provides an engaging and interactive experience for both locals and tourists in the area.

 

Events
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Thursday, April 09, 2020

In light of the current COVID-19 situation and the restrictions on non-essential public gatherings, the Kidsafe WA Child Injury Prevention Symposium has been postponed. Whilst this is disappointing, we have a duty to follow the direction from the State and Federal Government to ensure the health and safety of everyone involved. Kidsafe WA will seek to reschedule the Symposium for later in the year.


Stay tuned for a new event date coming soon - until then check out the event details below.

The Changes, Challenges and Accomplishments in Child Injury Prevention
over the last 40 Years

Preventable injury is a major cause of death and disability for Australians of all ages. Over 27 West Australian children die each year from preventable injuries, while a further 7,000 are hospitalised.

In 2020, Kidsafe WA will celebrate their 40th Anniversary. Over the past 40 years, Western Australia has achieved significant gains in the prevention of many types of childhood injuries including burns and scalds, poisoning, drowning, falls and road traffic accidents, as well as the areas of product safety and injury surveillance. This has required collaborative action from the government, not for profit organisations, the industry and the community to maximise the reach, efficiency and effectiveness of injury prevention initiatives. As we look towards the future of child injury prevention, Kidsafe WA would like to reflect on how far we have come and on the challenges and accomplishments that got us here.

Join us as we explore the changes, challenges and accomplishments in Western Australian child injury prevention over the last four decades.

Hear presentation from Colin Pettit, The Commissioner for Children and Young People of Western Australia, Professor Gervase Chaney, Dean of Medicine at Notre Dame University, representatives from the Department of Health, Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety (Consumer Protection), Telethon Kids Institute, and many more!

 

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Thursday, January 23, 2020

In November 2019 representatives from Kidsafe Western Australia joined other Kidsafe team members from around Australia, to attend the 14th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference hosted by the Australasian Injury Prevention Network (AIPN) in Brisbane. The conference was a great opportunity to network with other professionals in the injury prevention field and to showcase the work being done by Kidsafe throughout each state.

From Kidsafe WA, Anita Tsvetkov presented on the work being done across Western Australia to reduce the risk of farming injuries to children, highlighting the recently developed Parent’s Guide to Kidsafe Farms and the Keeping Kids Safe on Farms Animation. Also from Kidsafe WA, Gretchen Waddell presented a conference poster of the findings from the latest childhood injury report: Injuries to Aboriginal Children 2011-2015.


   Pictured: Gretchen Waddell, Susan Teerds, Cr Vicki Howard

Jason Chambers presented on an e-learning tool developed by Kidsafe Victoria, a child injury prevention module designed for maternal and child health nurses across the state. Jason’s second presentation discussed the safe transportation of vulnerable children in the community, looking at how to improve current child car restraint practices and policies that organisations have in place. Road safety was also covered by Stacie Powell from Kidsafe New South Wales, whom presented on their road safety program which is delivered to culturally and linguistically diverse groups and Aboriginal community groups across New South Wales.

From Kidsafe South Australia, McKeely Denholm discussed the vital role of education and enterprise in child injury prevention, looking at successful educational campaigns around button batteries and the safe use of baby slings. Lastly, the Chief Executive Officer from Kidsafe Queensland Susan Teerds was awarded the ‘Best Policy and Practice Oral Presentation’ for her discussion on the collaborative work of the Consumer Product Injury Research Advisory Group (CPIRAG) in Queensland.

With many Kidsafe representatives gathered for the conference in Brisbane, an event was also held on the first evening of the conference to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Kidsafe Australia. This was a great opportunity to celebrate the work of the many people over the past 40 years who have contributed to making a safer world for kids.

 

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Monday, March 25, 2019

The Western Australian Consumer Protection Awards recognise and reward the positive contributions of individuals, local government authorities, organisations, businesses and the media in advancing consumer advocacy in WA.

Promoting consumer product safety is a key factor in preventing childhood injuries and is a major component of the operations and activities of Kidsafe WA. Kidsafe WA also plays a key role in developing product safety policy and regulating traders in the state.

One award that makes up the Consumer Protection Awards is the Kidsafe WA Award. The Kidsafe WA Award acknowledges those in the community that have made a significant contribution to childhood injury prevention. It particularly recognises those who contribute to raising awareness of specific products hazards, designing new products that improve consumer safety and developing or delivering initiatives that raise community awareness of injury prevention issues for children.

This year the Kidsafe WA award went to ‘Bolt it Back for Reef’. Reef Kite tragically died in October 2015 after a set of drawers fell on him. His mum, Skye Quartermaine, had asked her landlord permission to anchor the drawers to the wall, but was not given approval. Reef’s aunty, Dee Quartermaine, started the Bolt it Back for Reef Facebook page to share his story. The page now has over 2,000 members and is used to raise awareness of dangers, share tips on restraining furniture and answer questions. Dee and Skye have campaigned for law changes that would allow tenants to anchor furniture without requiring landlord approval, provided any damage is repaired. The WA Coroner’s Report into Reef’s death made this recommendation and a bill was introduced in parliament in October 2018 to amend the Residential Tenancies Act. Congratulations to Bolt it Back for Reef for their amazing efforts in child injury prevention.


A Special Commendation was also given as part of the Kidsafe WA Award to Melanie Mitchell for her work in drowning prevention. Melanie launched Lachlan’s Legacy in honour of her almost 3 year old son Lachlan who died after drowning in a backyard pool at a family day care in 2015.

Congratulations to the winners and finalists of the 2019 Consumer Protection Awards and many thanks to all the nominees for their dedication to advancing consumer protection and injury prevention for children in Western Australia.

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Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Bring your family for a cosy night under the stars in Albany!

Kidsafe WA with the support of ATCO are holding an outdoor movie night in Albany Town Square on Saturday 6th April 2019. The movie we will be screening on the night is Smallfoot and the event is picnic style, so we encourage everyone to bring along food, chairs, blankets and pillows.

There will also be a raffle with lots of prizes to be won, with all proceeds going to Kidsafe WA.

 

 

If you have any queries please contact Kidsafe WA on (08) 6244 4880 or kidsafe@kidsafewa.com.au.

We look forward to seeing you then!


 

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Friday, October 05, 2018

The Western Australian Consumer Protection Awards is here again!

The Consumer Protection Awards provide an opportunity to reward and recognise the achievements of individuals, non-government organisations, businesses, local governments, journalists and media outlets that have increased awareness of consumer issues, provided support for disadvantaged consumers or contributed to injury prevention for children.


One category of the Consumer Protection Awards is the Kidsafe WA Award. The Kidsafe WA Award acknowledges an individual, local government, non-government organisation, business or group of individuals operating in Western Australia that have made a significant contribution to the advancement of injury prevention for children in Western Australia. They may have worked to raise awareness of specific product hazards, been involved in the design and development of new products, or have developed and delivered projects that raise community awareness of product safety.

If you or someone you know is a champion, make sure you submit your nomination by 5pm Friday 16 November 2018.

For more information on award categories and to submit a nomination, visit: https://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/consumer-protection/western-australian-consumer-protection-awards.

 

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Monday, July 02, 2018

Road traffic injuries are one of the leading causes of childhood injury in Australia. To ensure children are kept safe while travelling as passengers in motor vehicles, it is important to make sure they are using a child car restraint suitable for their age and size, and that it is correctly installed in the vehicle.


Kidsafe WA with the support of Britax will be offering free child car restraint checks at this year’s Perth Pregnancy Babies & Children’s Expo. Qualified child car restraint fitters will be available to check the fit of your child car restraint in the vehicle, and make any adjustments where necessary.

When: 10th, 11th and 12th August, 11.30am – 2.30pm each day.
Where: Claremont Showgrounds, entry via gate 1.
Cost: Free checks. Fits $20. Please note that any additional accessories required are at the cost of the customer. RSVP: No bookings required, but make sure to get down early so you don’t miss out!  

Be sure to also visit Kidsafe WA’s information stall at the expo over the weekend for information and advice on child safety at home, on the road and at play.

If you are unable to attend this event but would like to have your child car restraint checked or fitted, our Child Car Restraint Service runs at a number of locations in the Perth metropolitan area for a small fee. For more information on locations or to book an appointment call us on (08) 6244 4880 or visit http://www.kidsafewa.com.au/child-car-restraint-services-road.

For more information on the Pregnancy Babies & Children’s Expo visit http://www.pbcexpo.com.au/perth/.


 

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Monday, July 02, 2018

Entries are now open for the 2018 Kidsafe National Playspace Design Awards! The Awards recognise excellence and innovation in the provision of safe, creative playspaces. The Awards are open to playground owners, service providers, design professionals, students and landscapers across Australia. The Awards aim to promote inspirational, innovative, best practice play facilities that encourage healthy participation in recreational activities for all children.


Entries will be reviewed by a multi-disciplinary panel and will be assessed on the following aspects:

  • Project summary
  • Commitment to safe play environments
  • Innovative design
  • Inclusive playspace design
  • Community and culture
  • Shade elements
  • Sustainability
  • Successful outcomes of the project.

Award categories:

  • Education and Care Services: preschools, long day care, out of school hours care, vacation care, family day care.
  • Schools: public and private schools, primary and high schools.
  • Public Playspaces:
  • Up to $500K
  • $500K—$1M
  • $1M upwards.

Entries close Friday 27 July 2018, with winners announced 29 November 2018. For more details on eligibility and how to enter visit http://kidsafe.com.au/national-playspace-design-awards/.

 

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Monday, July 02, 2018

Schools are the second most frequent location for childhood injuries to occur after the home, accounting for just over 10 percent of all injury presentations to the Perth Children’s Hospital Emergency Department (PCH ED, formally Princess Margaret Hospital Emergency Department). Between July 2016 and June 2017 there were 1,908 individual presentations to PCH ED by children injured at school. Of these presentations, over 60 percent occurred in primary school aged children between 5 and 12 years of age.


Falls and blunt forces are common causes of school based injuries that usually occur as part of sport or playground activities. Bumps and grazes are a normal part of childhood, however there are some injuries that have severe and lasting effects. To help prevent unintentional injuries at school follow these tips:

  • Make sure adequate supervision is provided while children are in the classroom or at play;
  • Ensure playground equipment is appropriate for the intended age group and is used appropriately;
  • Avoid over-crowding in play areas;
  • Promote the use of safety equipment for sporting activities; and
  • Check that your school has suitable safety structures and procedures in place. 

Kidsafe WA deliver workshops in primary schools to promote safety and injury prevention throughout Western Australia. With the support of ATCO, Kidsafe WA will be launching the Get Creative about Safety Competition for primary school aged students in Term 3. This will include a Gas Safety Colouring In and Design a Comic Strip. ATCO owns and operates energy infrastructure, including Western Australia’s largest gas distribution network, which stretches more than 14,000km across Perth’s greater metropolitan area and regional centres including Geraldton, Kalgoorlie, Bunbury and Albany. Did you know that ATCO also provides a free excursion for years 5 and 6 at their purpose built facility, focussing on nutrition and gas safety?

For more information about Kidsafe WA services or the Get Creative about Safety Competition visit www.kidsafewa.com.au. For information on the ATCO ‘Adventures with Natural Gas Schools Program’ visit http://www.atcogasbfk.com.au/.

Supported by:

     

 

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Tuesday, April 03, 2018

 


On the 17th March 2018 Kidsafe WA held our first Pop Culture Quiz Night at the Subiaco Sports Bar. Around 150 people tested their knowledge of the 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and 90’s, whilst also enjoying a night of laughs and great prizes!

Donations from a number of local businesses helped make the night a success:

ENJO, Retravision, Dorel, Turner + Turner, Growers Lane, Fremantle Football Club, George's Bike Shop, The Giving Tree, Hawaiian, Swings & Roundabouts, Gravity Discovery Centre, Bunnings, Grill'd, Solarfruit, The Small Batch Gift Co, Taylors Art and Coffee House, Francesca's Kitchen, Rodan + Fields, No Toast, Kmart and The Cookie Box Australia.

Kidsafe WA would like to thank everyone who supported us by donating prizes and attending on the night. The money raised will assist us to purchase a much needed vehicle to educate the WA community on staying safe at home, at play and on the road.

 

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Monday, January 01, 2018

Kidsafe WA recently received a Highly Commended Award at the Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Awards, run by Injury Matters and Know Injury. Kidsafe WA received the award in the category of “Outstanding Achievement in Innovation or Research in Injury Prevention or Safety Promotion” for the Western Australia Childhood Injury Report: Patterns of Injury Among 0-19 Year Olds in Western Australia, 2001-2011

The Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Awards recognise the action and excellence of Western Australia’s injury prevention and safety promotion sector and the effort, commitment and extraordinary steps taken to improve injury prevention and safety promotion outcomes in the community.

The WA Childhood Injury Report was prepared by Kidsafe WA in partnership with the Epidemiology Branch of the Department of Health WA and the Injury Surveillance Unit at the Princess Margaret Hospital Emergency Department. The report examines a ten year period from 2001-2011 and provides an overview of unintentional and intentional childhood injuries in Western Australia in comparison to the previous reporting period from 1989-2000. Additionally, it includes regional, national and international comparisons. The report aims to support the work of key childhood injury prevention stakeholders, health practitioners, policy-makers and researchers to reduce the burden of childhood injuries in Western Australia.

Thank you to all involved in the project, and thank you to Injury Matters for hosting the awards to commemorate the initiatives and programs happening across Western Australia to prevent injury and promote safety. Congratulations to all nominees and winners of the Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Awards.

To view the Western Australia Childhood Injury Report: Patterns of Injury Among 0-19 Year Olds in Western Australia, 2001-2011 visit http://www.kidsafewa.com.au/other-research-professionals

 

Safety At Home
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Friday, January 24, 2020

Kidsafe WA produce a range of bulletins and reports covering prevalent child injury topics based on injury surveillance data collected at the Perth Children’s Hospital Emergency Department. Bulletins and reports analyse injury trends, cause, location of injuries, at risk demographics, treatment and prevention methods. Recent topics include Injuries within the Home, Injuries from Nursery Equipment, Poisoning and Sporting Injuries. If you are working within the health, child care or another relevant sector these reports can provide up to date evidence to support your injury prevention initiatives within the community.

If you would like to receive an electronic copy of the WA Childhood Injury Bulletins & Reports as they become available (twice yearly) or know of someone else who would find them useful please contact Jessica@kidsafewa.com.au or visit http://www.kidsafewa.com.au/wa-childhood-injury-surveillance-bulletins-amp-reports-professionals to see a full list of bulletins and reports.


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Friday, January 24, 2020

Kidsafe WA and ATCO recently visited Albany to deliver incursions to primary school students to teach them about natural gas and burns safety. The incursions are a new initiative of Kidsafe WA and ATCO’s partnership, and positive feedback was received from teachers and students.Sessions were delivered to year five students at Flinders Park Primary School and engaged students with activities to promote safety messages, in line with the Western Australian Curriculum. The incursions involved a session with ATCO covering natural gas, its origin and how it reaches our homes, along with a session with Kidsafe WA which included an introduction to burns, how we can prevent them and first aid for burns.


Thank you to Flinders Park Primary School for having us, and to ATCO for their support of Kidsafe WA’s child injury prevention programs!

For more information on Kidsafe WA and ATCO primary school programs, visit:
http://www.kidsafewa.com.au/for-primary-and-early-childhood-educators-professionals https://www.atco.com/en-au/for-home/blue-flame-kitchen.html

 

Supported by:


 

 

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Thursday, January 23, 2020

Did you know that on average one young child dies from drowning in a portable pool in Australia every year? In addition to portable pool drowning fatalities, other children who drown will be hospitalised and some left with severe brain damage.

As portable pools become cheaper and more popular, the chance of young children drowning grows, and it’s those children under five years old who are most at risk.

Consumer Protection WA, the ACCC and state and territory consumer protection/product safety regulators have joined forces with Royal Life Saving Society Australia to educate parents and carers about the drowning dangers associated with portable pools, along with general water safety tips to help keep kids safe.

Don’t Duck Out, Make It SAFE tips:

  • Supervise - Actively watch children within arm’s reach. Only leave adults in charge of kids.
  • Act - Learn CPR. Know to start compressions and breaths as soon as possible when a child is pulled from the water and to call triple zero (000) for help.
  • Fence - In WA and most of Australia, swimming pools with more than 30cm of water in them, are legally required to have a compliant safety barrier. Check with your local Council.
  • Empty - For pools that don’t need to be fenced, keep watch all day, then pour out water and store away from children, in a place where it can’t refill with rain or sprinkler water.

Your support in promoting this important campaign to the community would be greatly appreciated.

You can find resources including two videos, a factsheet, email signature graphic and much more at www.productsafety.gov.au/makeitsafe. If you’re posting about Don’t Duck Out, Make It SAFE on social, don’t forget to use the hash tags: #DontDuckOut #MakeItSafe.

Help us spread the word to keep kids safe!

 

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Wednesday, October 02, 2019

Kidsafe WA’s ongoing collaboration with Horizon Power continues to educate families on the importance of electrical safety within the home.

Electricity is a fundamental part of many households, but are you and your family aware of the potential risks? In Australia on average, three children under the age of 14 die as a result of an electrical injury each year and over 75 percent of children who present to hospital with an electrical injury have acquired their injury within the home.

The most common causes of electrical injury around the home include damaged or worn electrical cords, insertion of objects into power points, faulty appliances and contact between electrical appliances and water.

Kidsafe WA with the support of Horizon Power recently visited the Midwest region to provide workshops to children and families to promote child safety. These workshops included tips on how to reduce the risk of electrical injuries within the home.

Keep your family safe around the home with these top ten electrical safety tips:

1. Turn off appliances at the power point when not in use.

2. Ensure to only use ONE double adaptor per power point to prevent over loading.

3. Regularly check appliances for signs of damage or wear, and stop using them if faulty.

4. Never insert metal objects into power points.

5. Use safety covers to prevent and discourage children from inserting objects into power points.

6. Do not leave electrical appliances switched on and unattended around children.

7. Ensure that all electrical devices are kept away from water.

8. Try not to stretch or damage power cords. Remove appliances from power points by the plug and avoid pulling the cord.

9. Install a residual current device (RCD). Installing a RCD will automatically shut off power to your home in the event of an electrical fault in order to prevent electrocution.

10. Always use a licensed electrician to perform any electrical work in your home to ensure that you and your family are not harmed.

For more information on how to keep your children safe around electricity visit https://horizonpower.com.au/our-community/stay-safe-around-electricity/ OR www.kidsafewa.com.au/fact-sheets-at-home to see Kidsafe WA’s Electrical Safety Fact Sheet.

 

Supported by:


 

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Tuesday, July 02, 2019

Each year, around 500 children under the age of 15 present to the Perth Children’s Hospital Emergency Department with a burn or scald injury. Most of these injuries happen in or around the home, with the kitchen being the most common place for a burn or scald injury to occur.

Young children under the age of five are particularly at risk of burn and scald injuries, accounting for 67% of all burn and scald injuries in children between 2017 and 2018. Even with a parent present, burns and scalds can happen very quickly, so it is important to be alert and minimise the risk of an injury where possible.


Tips for keeping kids safe from burns in and around your home:

  • Keep small children out of the kitchen when cooking to avoid burns and scalds caused by hot food and drinks.
  • Never hold a child while preparing or consuming hot food and drinks.
  • When bathing children, never leave running water unattended and always test the water temperature before you let them get in.
  • Always run cold water at the start and end of running a bath so that the spout is left cool.
  • Set the thermostat on your hot water system to a maximum of 50°C. Hot water from the tap at 60°C can burn in less than a second, so it is best to set the water temperature to keep the risk to a minimum.
  • Always turn taps off tightly, so little hands can’t turn them on themselves.
  • Smoke alarms save lives. Make sure you have them installed and replace the batteries on April 1st every year.
  • Keep candles away from curtains and other materials and never leave them unattended.
  • Install guards around fires and heaters and always supervise children when they are in use.

First Aid Treatment for Burns

If your child does suffer a burn or scald, follow these steps to reduce the severity of the injury:

  • REMOVE – Remove yourself from danger and remove any nappies or clothing from the child so heat can escape.
  • COOL – Place the burn under cool running water for at least 20 minutes. Do not use ice, butter, or any ointments on the burn as this can cause further damage.
  • COVER – Cover the burn with cling wrap or a clean damp cloth.
  • SEEK – Seek medical attention if the burn is bigger than a 20 cent piece, or starts to blister. In an emergency, call 000 for an ambulance.

The majority of burns and scalds are preventable, and by being aware and making small changes, you can help to keep you and your family safe. Use the Home Burns Safety Checklist to identify any potential risks for burns and scalds.

For more information on preventing burns and scalds, click on the links below:

National Burns Awareness Month resources
Burns and Scalds Fact Sheet
Burns and Scalds Animation

 

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Tuesday, July 02, 2019

Kidsafe WA with the support of the Department of Health WA have released new resources focusing on farm safety to educate and inform the community on how to reduce the risk of child injury on the farm. Australian farms remain a high risk setting for injury and fatalities. As a farm is also a workplace, the number of potential hazards can be greater than that found in a typical home.

The new A Parent’s Guide to Kidsafe Farms covers safety around machinery and vehicles, hazardous chemicals, animals, quad bikes and many other farm hazards. It also features a Farm Safety Checklist to assist people to identify hazards on the farm and steps to reduce the risk of injuries from these. The guide can be downloaded electronically from the Kidsafe WA website, and printed copies will be provided to relevant communities on regional visits.


The Farm Safety Workshop is also available, which is a workshop that can be delivered for farming communities. The workshop will now be offered on all Kidsafe WA regional visits and is also available on request.

To view A Parent’s Guide to Kidsafe Farms click here.

To see more information or to request a Farm Safety Workshop click here.

Partner:

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Wednesday, January 09, 2019

Although we feel comfortable using electricity, don’t forget it can be dangerous. Over the last five years, there were over 50 presentations to the Perth Children’s Hospital Emergency Department for electrical injuries, many of which can be prevented. Common causes of electrical injury can include damaged or worn electrical cords, objects being inserted into power points, faulty appliances or light switches and contact between electrical appliances and water.


Kidsafe WA has teamed up with Horizon Power to promote electrical safety in regional communities across Western Australia. Below are some of the key messages from our friends at Horizon Power:

  • Water and electricity do not mix, so make sure to keep electrical appliances dry.
  • Install a residual current device – this is a safety switch to protect your family from electrocution.
  • Use a licenced electrician when renovating or doing home maintenance.
  • Check for any damaged or worn cords and replace them immediately.
  • Ensure the trees or branches around your home do not touch powerlines, as these could cause fires or other serious accidents. Hire a professional if the trees or branches around your home need to be trimmed.

For more information on how to keep your children safe around electricity visit:

https://horizonpower.com.au/our-community/stay-safe-around-electricity/ OR www.kidsafewa.com.au/fact-sheets-at-home to see Kidsafe WA’s Electrical Safety Fact Sheet.

Supported by:

 

 

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Friday, October 05, 2018

One of the leading causes of death for Australian children under 5 years of age is drowning. Statistics from the Royal Life Saving Society of Australia’s National Drowning Report show that in 2017/18, 18 Australian children aged 0 to 4 years drowned. The majority of these drowning incidents (67%) occurred in backyard swimming pools.

Matt Welsh OAM and Kidsafe Australia have teamed up to help save lives over summer. The ‘Safe Barriers Save Lives’ backyard pool safety campaign raises awareness of the importance for pool owners to check the safety of their pool barriers and set their backyard pool defence in the lead up to the warmer months. Safety barriers can be effective in reducing the risk of drowning incidents, however evidence suggests that a large number of drowning deaths are the result of barriers that are faulty or non-compliant with Australian Standards.

Here are some of the common issues with pool barriers:

  • Gates and doors don’t self-latch or self-close;
  • Climbable objects are often placed near the barrier which could allow a child to climb over the fence (e.g. pot plants, chairs, pool pumps near the pool barrier);
  • Excess space under the fence; and
  • Misuse of the gate (e.g. propping the pool gate open).

Simply having a pool barrier and gate isn’t ‘job done’. Kidsafe urges pool and spa owners to take 15 to 20 minutes to check and maintain their pool gate, barrier and its surrounds.

For further information on the campaign and to access resources including the Royal Life Saving Society of Australia’s home pool safety checklist, please visit http://kidsafe.com.au/closing-the-gate-on-backyard-drowning.

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Friday, October 05, 2018

Kidsafe WA with the support of the WA Department of Health has developed the Preventing Childhood Injuries Facilitator’s Guide and Video. The resource is designed to assist child health educators in delivering sessions on child safety to parents and carers of children aged 0 to 5 years.


The resource provides a session plan for facilitators to guide them in delivering a session, along with a USB with a video to play to participants. The video provided on the USB is split into two chapters based on children’s age and stage of development and relays information covered in the session plan. Topics covered include making the home a safer environment for children, transporting children safely, water safety, falls prevention, poison safety, burns prevention, safe sleeping and safety during outdoor play.

The Preventing Childhood Injuries Facilitator’s Guide and Video is available free of charge to child health educators working with parents and carers in WA. To order your copy, please place an order on the Kidsafe WA Online Shop at http://www.kidsafewa.com.au/professional-resources-1. For more information please email Gretchen@kidsafewa.com.au or call (08) 6244 4880.

 


Partner:

 

 

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Monday, July 02, 2018

Burns and scalds are one of the top causes of injury hospitalisation to Western Australian children, with nearly 500 children presenting to Perth Children’s Hospital Emergency Department (formally PMH ED) every year. Children aged under five are particularly at risk as they are becoming increasingly mobile but do not have the skills to assess dangers.


Common causes of burns and scalds in children include hot food and drink, hot water, heaters and fires, and household appliances. Many steps can be taken to prevent burns and scalds:

  • Ensure children are supervised around potential burn and scald hazards.
  • Set the hot water delivery temperature in the home to a maximum of 50°C. A licensed plumber can do this for you.
  • When bathing your child, turn the cold water on first and off last, and never leave a hot running bath unattended.
  • Never hold a child while having a hot drink.
  • Install guards around heaters and fireplaces.
  • Keep children out of the kitchen in a safe play area while cooking.
  • Choose low fire-risk children’s nightwear that is close fitting and made of less flammable material.
  • Keep appliances and cords out of reach of children.
  • Install smoke alarms, test them regularly and replace batteries on 1st April every year.
  • Develop a home fire escape plan with your family.

Administering first aid to burns and scalds straight away can help to reduce the severity of the injury. If your child sustains a burn or scald, follow these steps:

  • Remove any wet clothes. If the clothes are stuck to the skin, keep them on.
  • Immediately run the burn or scald under cool running water for at least 20 minutes – do not use ice, ointments, oils, butter or creams.
  • Keep the child warm to prevent them from going into shock.
  • Seek medical attention if the burn or scald is on the face, hands, feet, genitals or buttocks, or if it is larger than a 20 cent coin or blistered.

Follow the links below for more information on burns and scalds:

 
 

Safety During Play
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Wednesday, October 02, 2019

The Kidsafe WA Playground Advisory Service (PAS) was honoured to be recognised as a joint winner in the recent AILA WA Landscape Architecture Awards for Sea Play on the Bay on the Busselton Foreshore. Kidsafe WA’s PAS worked as safety consultants with the designers Plan E and the construction team, to help guide the construction of a play space that is engaging for children and has an element of risk.

Sea Play on the Bay’s design was inspired by the city’s maritime history and coastal landscape. The centrepiece of the playground is the impressive bespoke designed clipper ship. This represents the clipper ships that transported goods and people from Busselton Jetty.


The play space is comprised of both a wet and dry area which creates an environment that engages children’s senses. Sea Play on the Bay was commended for its non-traditional design that incorporates many elements such as lighting, water and bespoke play equipment. The play space also includes a range of equipment that is suitable for children of all ages and abilities. Dramatic special effect lighting is also featured in this play space which enables the park to be used by patrons both day and night.

The play space is situated at the popular Busselton Foreshore it provides an engaging and interactive experience for both locals and tourists in the area.

 

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Wednesday, September 27, 2017

The number of children with sporting injuries has continued to rise over the last five years, with an average of 4,300 children attending the Princess Margaret Hospital each year. Older children aged between 10 and 14 years are at greater risk of sustaining a sports-related injury. This is possibly due to a decrease in rule modification as children get older and a higher number of older children participating in competitive sports in comparison to younger children. Males also account for two thirds of all sports-related injuries.

The Kidsafe WA Sports app is now available for download via the Apple and Google Play app stores. The app covers key topics of preparing for sport, safety equipment, hydration, heat related injury, concussion and first aid. Additional features include checklists for coaches, parents and young athletes, injury record, nearest medical facilities, UV and temperature ratings and water consumption.

 

Sport and physical activity are a vital part of childhood development, allowing children to improve physical, cognitive and social skills with others. Injury risks however, are often perceived as a barrier to participation. Kidsafe WA Sports provides a range of tools to assist coaches, parents and players on how to reduce the risk of childhood injury during sport and physical activity. Kidsafe WA Sports will help make sure kids are playing sport, not injured on the sidelines!

For more information visit: www.kidsafewa.com.au/sport-safety-play

 

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Friday, July 07, 2017

Each year an average of 4,300 children attend the Princess Margaret Hospital Emergency Department (PMH ED) due to a sports-related injury. This accounts for 22.5% of all injury presentations to the PMH ED.

Older children aged between 10 and 14 years are at greater risk of sustaining a sports-related injury. This is possibly due to a decrease in rule modification as children get older and a higher number of older children participating in competitive sports in comparison to younger children. Males also account for two thirds of all sports-related injuries.

Sport and physical activity are a vital part of childhood development, allowing children to improve physical, cognitive and social skills with others. Injury risks however, are often perceived as a barrier to participation. An estimated 50 percent of sporting injuries are considered to be preventable.

Australian Rules Football is the most commonly recorded activity associated with sporting injuries, followed by soccer, basketball, rugby and netball.

Common injury presentations include sprains and strains, fractures, bruising, cuts, dislocations and internal injuries. These are most commonly sustained to the upper and lower limbs as well as the facial, head and neck/torso areas.

To reduce your child’s risk of sports-related injury Kidsafe WA recommend the following:

  • Ensure your child wears appropriate protective equipment for their chosen sport. This may include mouthguards, eyewear, helmets, protective padding, footwear and gloves.
  • Drink water to stay hydrated while participating in sporting activities
  • Always warm up and cool down before and after sporting activities.
  • Children should participate in sports that have modified rules and equipment appropriate to their development. Modified sports include AusKick, Minkey, NetSetGo and Kanga Cricket.
  • Do not allow children to play sport while tired, ill or injured. Ensure the appropriate recovery time is allocated.
  • Sporting grounds and facilities should be checked regularly for damaged playing surfaces, fencing, lights, posts, padding and rubbish.

For more information on how to protect your children from injury visit: www.kidsafewa.com.au

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Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Staying hydrated

Drinking fluids is an important part of participating in any sport or recreational activity. Staying well hydrated reduces your risk of sustaining a heat related injury and can increase physical performance levels.

Children at young ages are more susceptible to heat stress, so parents must be diligent in maintaining and replacing fluids. Exercise increases the body’s need for fluid. This can be further affected by environmental conditions, time and intensity of exercise, heat acclimatisation and personal sweat rates. During summer in WA, particular care should be taken to replace fluids. Cool water is the best choice for children to stay hydrated during sport and physical activity.

For youth participating in prolonged high intensity activity, such as long distance running, there are benefits to using sports drinks containing carbohydrate and salt (electrolytes) replacements. High calorie sports drinks however, are generally unnecessary for most children participating in routine physical activity on the sports field or in the school yard. A high intake of sports drinks can result in an increased risk of weight gain, as well as tooth decay and erosion. Energy drinks containing high amounts of caffeine should NOT be used by any young athlete, even those of elite levels.

 

Heat related injury

Long periods of high intensity exercise can put the body at risk of heat injury. The risk of heat injury is heightened by hot and humid weather. Signs and symptoms of heat injury can include: fatigue, feeling hot, thirst, nausea, headache, dizziness, light headedness, confusion, collapsing, pale, clammy skin or dry skin and irritability.

If a child is suspected of heat injury, remove them from play and administer the following first aid: 

1.Lie down in the shade and raise legs 

2.Loosen tight clothing 

3.Cool by fanning or sponging with water 

4.Apply cool or ice packs to neck, groin and armpits 

5.Give cool water to drink if fully conscious 

6.If the person does not recover quickly seek medical assistance.

 

For more information visit www.kidsafewa.com.au/sport-safety-play.
 

 

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Monday, October 26, 2015

 

Falls continue to be a leading cause of hospitalisation for children under 15 years of age.

Between July 2013 and June 2014 over 19,000 children presented to Princess Margaret Hospital Emergency Department (PMH ED) with an injury, and of these presentations approximately 38.5 percent (n=7,566) of the injuries were as a result of a fall. This has risen since 2009-10 where 36.6 percent (n=6,111) of the presentations were due to falls.

Fall presentations can be broken down into three groups: fall from the same level, fall from less than one metre high, and fall from more than one metre high. Between July 2013 and June 2014 the most common cause was a fall on the same level, accounting for 56.3 percent (n=19,635) of fall injuries, this was followed by a fall from less than one metre (33.9%, n=11,849) and then a fall from greater than one metre (9.8%, n=3,416). A large proportion of these presentations were minor cases, however it is still important to take the appropriate safety measures to reduce these numbers. The simple steps you can take to reduce the risk of a fall include:

  • Always supervise your children
  • Always use harnesses in highchairs and prams
  • Never leave babies alone on a raised surface
  • Ensure you purchase equipment with the Australian Standards tick of approval
  • If using bunk beds, ensure they have guard rails and a fixed ladder
  • Use gates /barriers at the top and bottom of stairs
  • Ensure stairs are well lit and that children can reach the light switches
  • Keep objects and furniture that children can climb away from windows and balconies

Although some falls may seem difficult to prevent, falls can be prevented!

Watch our falls prevention animation at here

Safety On The Road
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Thursday, April 09, 2020

For years the idea of autonomous vehicles has captured the human imagination. As technology advances at an increasing speed, it will only be a matter of time before these vehicles are on our roads. Current research estimates that by 2025 there will be approximately 8 million autonomous or semi-autonomous cars around the world, many of which will travel on Australian roads.

Full Automation Vehicles (Level 5) will be programmed to drive themselves and will not require any steering, accelerating, and/or braking from the vehicle occupant(s). These vehicles have the potential to completely revolutionise private transportation, especially for those who cannot legally or safely drive themselves due of age or disability. As this technology becomes increasingly available, what are the perceived benefits and risks of Autonomous Vehicles amongst our most vulnerable road users?


The Monash University Accident Research Centre (MUARC) is conducting an online survey that aims to understand parents’ attitudes towards using an automated vehicle to enhance their children’s mobility. The online survey will take about 20-25 minutes to complete.* All participants who complete the online survey can enter a draw to win one of five $100 gift vouchers!

Take the survey at https://monash.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0BVnUmsWbHxRPKJ

*Please note only eligible participants can complete the survey. Participants must be aged 18 years or older, be an active driver (i.e., drive at least once per week) and have at least one child (aged 17 years or younger) who lives with them.



Reference: https://www.abiresearch.com/press/abi-research-forecasts-8-million-vehicles-ship-sae-level-3-4-and-5-autonomous-technology-2025/

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Wednesday, October 02, 2019

Australia’s National Best Practice Guidelines for Child Car Restraints are being updated.


The guidelines are a partnership between Kidsafe Australia and Neuroscience Research Australia, initially developed in 2013 in collaboration with key stakeholders from around the country. Australian research has demonstrated that inappropriate and incorrect restraint use among children in cars is widespread but that the greatest gains in reducing child mortality and morbidity in crashes can be made by targeting both correct and appropriate use of a child restraint, which will result in the optimal protection of children travelling in cars (Du et al., 2010).

The updated version (2019) of the guidelines public comment phase will commence on October 2nd and close on November 1st before being finalised for publication.

Are you passionate about child passenger safety? Have your say on the guidelines updates.

Comments can be submitted via:

A copy of the draft guidelines and submission form can be obtained from the NeuRA website or by contacting NationalGuidelines@neura.edu.au or Kidsafe WA on (08) 6244 4880.

 

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Wednesday, October 02, 2019

Every year approximately 5,000 Australian children are rescued from parked cars. Three-quarters of these children are under four years old. Leaving children unattended in the car, even for a short time, can be fatal. Even on a cool day the temperature in a parked car can be over 30 degrees hotter than outside. In fact, 75 percent of the total temperature rise can occur within the first 5 minutes of parking.


Children are at greater risk as they do not tolerate heat as well as adults and tend to feel the effects more rapidly. This could lead to dehydration and other health risks. Children may also become emotionally distressed when left alone.

Here are some of the key ways you can reduce the risk:

  • Never leave your child unattended in a car.
  • Plan to complete quick jobs when you don’t have children with you.
  • Seek ‘pay at the pump’ fuel stations.
  • Provide plenty of cool fluids, preferably water, on car trips.
  • Plan journeys for the cooler hours of the day.
  • Ensure cars are locked and the keys are out of reach of children to prevent them gaining access to the car.

To raise awareness and reduce the number of children left unattended in cars, Kidsafe WA have designed car park signs that can be purchased by organisations. These are ideally suited for car parks at parks, recreation centres, community centres, libraries, beaches, swimming pools, entertainment venues, shopping complexes and schools. The signs can be installed to remind community members to take their children with them.

Car park signs take approximately 2-3 weeks to manufacture and can be ordered via the order form on the Kidsafe WA website.

For more information on Hot Cars see the Kidsafe WA Hot Cars Fact Sheet and the Parents’ Guide to Kidsafe Roads.

 

 

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Tuesday, July 02, 2019

Did you know Kidsafe WA is a Registered Training Organisation? We have been delivering quality nationally recognised accredited training since 2010 and want to continue to help individuals, organisations and businesses to meet their training needs.

All of our training courses have an emphasis on practical skills. At least 50% of the time spent undertaking training with Kidsafe is putting knowledge and skills into practice

Child Car Restraint Training

Our child car restraint fitting course (52778WA) is designed to assist those wanting to deliver services to the public, and be recognised as an Authorised Installer on the WA Type 1 Fitters Network. In the past we have had staff from baby goods retailers, vehicle service and repairers, vehicle and restraint hire services, government department transport employees, health and other industries participate in either our regularly scheduled courses or host their own courses in-house.

If you transport children in your job role but don’t need to be recognised as a Type 1 Fitter, our Child Car Restraint Education Workshop is aligned with the single unit of competency RSCICR301A and provides you everything you need to know around transporting children in your vehicle fleet using your own restraints.

Playground Training

Need to undertake Playground Inspections in your workplace? We offer all levels through our three different courses in Visual, Operational and Comprehensive inspections aligned with national units of competency AHCPGD206, AHCPGD305 and AHCPGD505.

Why not contact us to find out more about how we can tailor our accredited training courses to meet your staff training needs. For full details of our courses and scheduled dates visit www.kidsafewa.com.au/rto or contact our Manager of Training Services here.

 

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Friday, October 05, 2018

Being a pedestrian can be dangerous, so it is important to teach children the skills to navigate the roads safely. Each year over 1,300 children present to the Perth Children’s Hospital Emergency Department for a road traffic injury. A large number of these injuries are to children as pedestrians, either on foot or wheels, which includes bicycles and other small wheeled devices.

 

Here are some simple steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of pedestrian injuries:

  • Always supervise children near traffic.
  • Adults should be a good role model and demonstrate safe behaviours when near the road.
  • Teach children about choosing safe places to cross the road and to stop, look, listen and think before crossing the road.
  • Ensure children learn and practise how to use equipment in a safe place away from roads, driveways and slopes.
  • Make sure the brakes and locking mechanism for bicycles or other small wheeled devices work before using them.
  • Make sure children use protective equipment such as helmets, wrist, knee and elbow guards when using small wheeled devices.
  • Ensure children wear bright coloured clothing so that they stand out and are easy to see when near the road.

To find out more about how you can educate young children about becoming safe and independent road users, have a look at the Smart Steps education program by School Drug Education and Road Aware. This program is ideal for educators of young children under the age of four years old, and provides the skills required to teach road safety information to young children. For more information visit http://www.sdera.wa.edu.au/programs/smart-steps/.

For more information about road safety visit http://www.kidsafewa.com.au/road or contact Kidsafe WA on (08) 6244 4886.

Supported by


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Friday, October 05, 2018

As we move into the warmer months, it is important to remember how dangerous it can be to leave a child unattended in a parked car.

On a typical summer’s day the temperature in a parked car can be over 30 degrees hotter than outside, and unfortunately children do not tolerate heat well. This could lead to dehydration and other health related issues.

Here are some things you can do to reduce the risk of leaving children unattended in a car:

  • Plan to complete quick jobs when you don’t have children with you;
  • Seek service stations offering pay at the pump;
  • Ensure cars are locked and the keys are out of reach of children to prevent children gaining access to the car; and
  • Always check the car before you leave it.

Kidsafe WA has also developed car park signs which can be purchased by organisations to install in local car parks. The car park signs act as a reminder to community members to take their children with them after parking the car.

 

Let’s work together to raise awareness and reduce the number of children left unattended in parked cars.

For more information about the ‘Do Not Leave Children in Cars’ campaign or to order car park signs contact us on (08) 6244 4880 or visit www.kidsafewa.com.au/do-not-leave-children-in-cars-campaign.

Other useful links:


 

 

 

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Tuesday, April 03, 2018

To encourage schools to talk about road safety with their early childhood students, School Drug Education and Road Aware (SDERA) has provided a road safety storybook to every pre-primary class in WA.


That’s the Sound the Street Makes, written by renowned Australian author Danny Katz and illustrated by Mitch Vane, follows the story of Ella on her journey to school, and teaches children how to be aware in a traffic environment. Schools with multiple pre-primary classes can order additional books free of charge by contacting SDERA.

To learn more about how your school or childcare centre can educate children about road safety have a look at SDERA’s Smart Steps program. Smart Steps is a road safety program for educators of young children under the age of eight. It facilitates a partnership between early childhood educators and parents/carers to guide young children's learning in becoming safe and independent road users of the future. The Smart Steps program includes a professional learning workshop and various road safety resources to support educators.

To find out more about the program visit www.sdera.wa.edu.au/programs/smart-steps/

 

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Wednesday, September 27, 2017

As summer is approaching Kidsafe WA would like to remind everyone of the dangers of leaving kids in cars. Kidsafe WA’s ‘Do Not Leave Children in Cars’ campaign aims to raise community awareness and reduce the number of children left unattended in parked cars in Western Australia.

Even on a cool day the temperature in a parked car can be over 30 degrees hotter than outside. In fact, 75% of the total temperature rise can occur within the first five minutes of parking a car. This is why it is important to take children with you, even when running a quick errand.

Kidsafe WA is seeking your help to spread the message. We have designed car park signs which can be purchased by organisations to install in local car parks. The ‘Do Not Leave Children in Cars’ car park signs act as a reminder to community members to take their children with them after parking the car.

For more information about this campaign or to order car park signs contact us on (08) 6244 4880 or visitwww.kidsafewa.com.au/do-not-leave-children-in-cars-campaign.

 

Other useful links:

‘Unconventional Oven’ project http://theunconventionaloven.com.au/

Hot Car Fact Sheet http://www.kidsafewa.com.au/fact-sheets-road

 

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Friday, July 07, 2017

Children are at significant risk of road injuries in Australia, with transport-related injuries one of the leading causes of death in children under the age of 15. In the 2008/09 financial year alone, there were over 7,000 injuries to Australian children under the age of 15 caused by land transport accidents. The road setting is not limited to traffic areas on public roads and carparks, but also settings such as driveways, farm areas, nature reserves and skate parks.

New data released by Kidsafe WA, with the support of the Western Australian Department of Health shows 14,290 road-related injury presentations were made to the PMH ED between July 2006 and June 2016. This accounts for 8.4% of all injury presentations. Other key findings from the Kidsafe WA Childhood Injury Research Report: Road Injuries show:

  • Leading causes of road-related injuries to children include as a wheeled pedestrian, such as those using scooters, skateboards or rollerblades (38.0%), cyclist (33.7%), passenger in a vehicle (13.3%), motorcyclist (6.3%) and pedestrian (5.2%).
  • Males are at greater risk of sustaining a road-related injury. 
  • Older children aged between 10-14 years are at greater risk of sustaining an injury as a wheeled pedestrian, cyclist, pedestrian or on a motorcycle in comparison to younger children.
  • The risk of injury as a passenger in a vehicle was consistent across all age groups.
  • Young children under the age of 5 are at greater risk of hot car entrapment and driveway reversing run-overs.
  • 19.5% of cyclists were recorded as wearing a helmet and only 4.0% of wheeled pedestrians.

Compared to adults, children are more at risk of injury within the road setting due to a range of developmental, environmental and physical factors. At a young age, children’s cognitive skills and motor function are not fully developed, resulting in them being more susceptible to injuries from transport related causes. Their vulnerability is also increased by factors such as their small stature, their inability to assess risks, lack of supervision, lack of adequate safety restraints or protective equipment, and a lack of understanding of road rules.

Kidsafe WA have a range of road safety resources outlining methods of road injury prevention. For more information on how to reduce the risk of road-related injuries visit: www.kidsafewa.com.au/road

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Friday, July 07, 2017

Road traffic injuries are one of the leading causes of childhood injury in Australia. One of the major concerns are injuries to children as motor vehicle passengers. This is why is it important to make sure that children are using a correctly fitted child car restraint suitable for their age and size.

With the support of Britax Australia, Kidsafe WA will be offering a free child car restraint checking service at the Better Baby Deals in Bunbury at the end of this month. One of our qualified child car restraint fitters will be at the store waiting to check the fitting of the child car restraints in your car, and will make any adjustments necessary to ensure the children in your car are transported safely.

Make sure to take note of the details below to get your child car restraints checked for free.

Where: Better Baby Deals, Corner Strickland Street, Bunbury WA 6230

When: Thursday 20th & Friday 21st of July 2017, 10am to 4pm

Saturday 22nd July 2017, 10am to 2pm

RSVP: No bookings are required. Just make sure you get there early so you do not miss out on your chance to get your child car restraint checked for free.

 

If you cannot attend this event, Kidsafe WA offers a child car restraint fitting and checking service for a small fee at our centre Monday to Saturdays in West Leederville, Glengarry Hospital and various Bunnings and Baby Buntings stores.

For more information contact Kidsafe WA on 08 6244 4880 or visit www.kidsafewa.com.au.